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This Page Last Updated:  July 9, 2017




Credits



        The following are the known references that we've located to material on or derived from our web site.  There have been additional mentions on various forums and we occasionally receive praise in random e-mails offering new information, corrections or questions.  Of course, prior to the end of February 2016, all of the references of what are now magiminiland.org pages were phoenixbonsai.com .



        The July 3 issue of the Slovak bonsai blog by Ladislav Lencucha contained a small selection of material from our Kokufuten page and recommended it for the whole story.

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        Also on May 3, a Chinese article about a puzzle that has troubled naturalists for 200 years included the map of the Fa-Tee gardens and information about John Reeves from our Dr. Clarke Abel page.

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        A May 3, 2017 answer to an original 2016 question "Why does this Jade plant have small leaves when compared to other Jade plants?" on the Gardening & Landscaping Stack Exchange forum included a link to our Portulacaria page.

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        Since at least June 2016 the Broward Bonsai Society of Florida has had an updated link to our Bonsai Book of Days listing on their home page.

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        In the 2015 book Qing Encounters: Artistic Exchanges between China and the West, our page "A Chronology of Dwarf Potted Trees in England" is listed on pg. 121 as one of two references cited in footnote 9 for the chapter "Nineteenth-Century Canton Gardens and the East-West Plant Trade" by Yuen Lai Winnie Chan.

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        Since at least the December 2015 issue of Bonsai News, the monthly newsletter of the Lake Charles Bonsai Society edited by this website's friend Alan Walker, their detailed event calendar has ended with this mention: "For an excellent listing of known recurring bonsai events, please visit http://www.magiminiland.org/Conventions.html."

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        By the end of September 2015, a Persian-language recreation/entertainment website contained a reformatted (right-to-left) but unattributed version of the first section of our English language Conventions & Symposia.

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        The first issue of Bonsai Digital, Sept/Oct 2015, included our article "The Big Picture."

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        The July 20, 2015 TodayIFoundOut.com article "Bonsai!" includes the line "According to bonsai historian Robert Baran, by the late 18th century a show for 'traditional pine dwarf potted trees' was held annually in Kyoto where, 'Connoisseurs from five provinces and the neighboring areas would bring one or two plants each to the show in order to submit them to the visitors for ranking or judging.'"

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        On June 15, 2015, Wayne Schoech's blog BonsaiBark published a second article "Crème de la Bonsai" referencing our Kokufu pages (which is actually a reprint of an April 16, 2013 article we had not come across previously).

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        "Integral Ecopsychological Investigation of Bonsai Principles, Meaning and Healing" by Caroll Hermann (First Version 2013, Final Version June 2015, © 2015 University of Zululand, South Africa) was written as a Doctoral thesis by a clinical psychologist and former editor of the Bonsai in South Africa online magazine.   Caroll was awarded her degree in May.  Four of the citations in her research came from our website.

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        On March 24, 2015, Wayne Schoech's blog BonsaiBark published the article "A Good Time to Introduce Yourself to Phoenix Bonsai" which emphasized our Kokufu pages.

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        Manuela Manda's paper "Miniature Landscapes" in Annals of the University of Craiova 20(56):207-213, January 2015, contains references to Some of what we don't know and Origins of Some of the Terms.

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        The January 2015 issue of the Austin Bonsai Society's "Bonsai Notebook" includes the Oct. 11, 2014 meeting minutes of the Lone Star Bonsai Federation.  Under the section headed "Committee Reports" (pg. 5), can be found: "John Miller wrote the 'History' section of the [Houston convention] handbook.  Mark [Bynum] is asking for a 3-5 member committee to update this section and to product [sic] a list of Presidents and convention sites.  It was noted that Robert Baran of the Phoenix Bonsai Society maintains a section of their website on the history of bonsai.  That website is at www.phoenixbonsai.com."

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        By the end of 2014, under the section headed "Japanese Americans in Arizona," our history Designing Dwarfs in the Desert is listed as one of the citations in the Selected Bibliography of the Japanese American National Museum.

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        A December 17 blog entry for "Bonsai Penjing & More," "Displaying Bonsai with a Companion Plant - Is It a 20th Century Revival of an Ancient Practice?," ends with this paragraph: "Perhaps some bonsai historian, such as Robert Baran of the Phoenix Bonsai Society, could give us insights into my question.  Robert Baran has done a tremendous amount of research and has an excellent site on bonsai history, I admire his dedication and thoroughness in his research, all well documented with sources."

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        A September 2014 note "From the Editor" of the ABS Journal, Bob King, for the Vol. 48 Issue 3 which commemorates the contributions of late horticulturist John Yoshio Naka to the art of bonsai culture, on pg. 3 recommends our biography.

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        The Bosaldo Price website's three September listings for Masakuni Tools -- Root Cutter / Small, Long blade pruning shears, and Wire pliers small -- list the June 7, 2014 update of our Kyuzo Murata biography as one of the references.

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        (That same update is also somewhat puzzlingly listed as a related article for the Drama Spoiler Full website's article on Iker Bonsai Pots.  A current search of our website shows the only reference to Iker can be found in our "About Bonsai Pots and Potters" piece, not the Murata bio.)

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        The mid-July 2014 application info for the 3rd National Juried Bonsai Pot Exhibition to be held June 12, 2015 to August 2, 2015 at the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum, Washington DC under the topic of MEDIA & LIMITATIONS does include the following point:
"* have a minimum of one, 3/4" drain hole (2 or 3 are usually optimal) and 4-6 smaller, 1/8 to 1/4" wire tie-in holes spaced and towards the outer edge of the floor close to the walls.  The Phoenix Bonsai Society site has information specific to bonsai pots and links to Bonsai potter's websites: http://www.phoenixbonsai.com/BigPicture/Pots.html."  (Italicised in the original piece)  Accessed 24 Aug, 2014.

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        A 15 Apr, 2014 article by Anja Eichler, "Griddle Incense Ass - or - Lost in Translation Thoughts about Cultural Identity in Jewelry Using the Example of Penjing in the Works of Shannon Guo, uses two comments about penjing from our "History of Bonsai" piece on BonsaiEmpire to explain the significance of three unique rings which depict plant and stone.

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        And that BonsaiEmpire article was also referenced as the source for several quotes in the authorless The Australian Journey part I: text which was compiled for the 26th Association of Australian Bonsai Clubs Conference in May of 2013.

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        Our article "Hachi-No-Ki" was reprinted, with permission, in the June/July 2013 issue of the Bonsai in South Africa magazine, pp. 12-14.

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        In the otherwise undated 2013 San Francisco Chronicle article from the Real Estate section, "How to Prune African Sumac" by Michelle Miley, our When to Prune article is listed as the second reference.  Accessed 24 Feb, 2013.

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        A January 20, 2013 article in Herald Sun (Australia), Kew believed to be home of Australia's first bonsai trees" by Greg Gliddon, relates how Lindsay Farr of Hawthorn Bonsai Farm, is helping American bonsai historian Robert J. Baran research the Japanese art form in Australia.  Specifically, because of an article on our website, "Lady McEacharn At Home," about the earliest known bonsai in Farr's area a century earlier.

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        An unaccredited copy of our article Fei Jiang-Fang was posted on June 6, 2012 to the Gathering Wisdom blog, A Wonderful Legend: The Origin of the Bonzai Tree?

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        By November 2011, the Iowa Bonsai Association's website page of links, included this listing:
"Bonsai Pots For the ultimate current summary of what there is to know and what you should know about bonsai pottery, including finding a good source and selecting the right pot, see the page:
        ABOUT BONSAI POTS AND POTTERS (www.phoenixbonsai.com/BigPicture/Pots.html), which is a page within the ever growing, metastasizing [sic] bonsai web monster noted above -- Magical Miniature Landscapes (www.phoenixbonsai.com/BonsaiHistory.html)."

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        An August 2011 revision of a paper originally done in the Spring of 1986 by Aaron H. Caplan lists our article -- now http://www.magiminiland.org/1800Refs/Dunn.html -- on the second page "Note on Reformatting" as one of four modern alternative sources of information about Nathan Dunn.

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        The June 21, 2011 printing of WRA Species Report - Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project has a nice summary of a wide range of info about Portulacaria afra, including two citations to our monograph.

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        A March 5, 2011 article in French on the "History of Satsuki" by Michel Otto from the Bonsaï & Notes website lists our work as one of the sources.

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        In Issue 181 of "The Interpreter" (dated March 1, 2011 but issued earlier) newsletter of The US Navy Japanese/Oriental Language School Archival Project, the otherwise undated 2013 San Francisco Chronicle, pg. 4 contains the article "A JLO &: Bonsai Gardens."  The section from the Murata bio mentioning Leo R. Bell is reproduced along with the image from Murata's grandson of the visitor's log Bell signed -- PLUS a close-up of Bell from his wedding photo a few years earlier. 

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        On October 1, 2010, the Bonsai Basho online Bonsai marketplace website reprinted our John Naka biography as Part I and Part II, with a link to our home page given.

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        The June 25, 2010 issue of Bonsai Dominicano includes a non-cited Spanish language translation about "Fudo" from our Kyuzo Murata article.
(A Turkish translation of most of the "Fudo" section without citation was published on December 1, 2012 on the agaclar.net Forum.)
(A Croatian translation of the "Fudo" section with citation was published on September 24, 2013 on the Bonsai Zen website.)

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        The March 26, 2010 entry about the Kokofu Bonsai-Ten by Wayne Schoech for Bonsaibark.com used material from our article and includes the following comment:
"Phoenix Bonsai has one of the very best bonsai sites around.  Somebody has been putting a lot of energy into it for a long time, and it shows.  Check it out."

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        The November/December 2009 issue of East Rand Bonsai Kai's Newsletter, pp. 2-3 includes three excerpts from our November and December Book of Days listings.

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        An Oct. 22, 2009 posting on Sandy Wong's Happy Bonsai web journal mentions our stamp pages.

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        Prior to Sept. 22, 2009, an Italian site reproduced one of our Bonsai Book pages without attribution.

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        A page and a half review of some of the wonders of our web site can be found in the July/August 2009 issue of Golden States Bonsai Federation's Golden Statements, pp. 15-16, with eight links to and six graphics from the web site.

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        The May 7, 2009 blog entry "Incense, 113 B.C." referenced an old version of our Boshanlu article for further information.

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        Seven footnotes, on pages 12-15, in the Asian Research Institute Working Paper Series No. 111, April 2009, "A Teahouse in the Gilded Age: The Story of the Georgian Court University (GCU) Meiji Teahouse" by Lim Tai Wei, reference "The State of Horticulture in Britain, With an Eye to Japanese Gardening" section of our Horticulture In Britain and The Japan-British Exhibition of 1910 article.   (That article was accessed 1 Oct 2007 for the paper.)

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        Jessika Toothman's article What's the difference between bonsai and topiary? for the website Howthingswork? on 10/10/2008 referenced our "The Big Picture: A Summary of the History of Magical Miniature Landscapes" page.

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        For the sidebox (towards the bottom of the page) "An American Bonsai Master" to Sara Elliott's article How bonsai works for the website Howthingswork? on 09/08/2008 our "John Yoshio Naka" page was referenced.

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        Although our Portulacaria monograph is correctly cited in the List of References on pg. 194 of Hugh T. W. Tan and Giam Xingli's 2008 Plant Magic, Auspicious and Inauspicious Plants from Around the World (Marshall Cavendish International (Asia) Private Limited) for information on the miniature jade plant, for the caption on page 50 and text on pg. 51 in the "Crassula ovata" article, miniature jade is incorrectly referred to as Portulaca [sic] afra.

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        In an interesting roundabout, the brief biography for Richard Gordon Smith in the new edition of his Ancient Tales and Folklore of Japan, republished by Forgotten Books in 2008, pp. vii-viii, is credited to phoenixbonsai.com.  Our info, of course, was from Gordon Smith's late published diaries, as found here.

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        Our Paintings page(s) was named "Bonsai Site of the Month -- March 2008" (towards the bottom of the page) by the Wirral Bonsai Society (Birkenhead, Merseyside, UK), "Click on the link above for a journey into the visual history of bonsai pictures - as depicted in scrolls, woodblock prints and paintings."

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        The August 2007 edition of the Ann Arbor Bonsai Society newsletter page 9 includes an article by Mike Simmons, "Bonsai Notables on the Internet," about bonsai stamps, of course, referencing our pages.

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        Less a kudo than a July 22, 2007 professional listing [not made by us and unfortunately no longer extant] with the Arts and Humanities service of Intute which offered an easy-to-use and powerful tool for discovering the best Internet resources for education and research in Creative Arts and Humanities.

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        For her May 2007 project in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Arts Degree in Broadcast Journalism, Gabrielle Michelle Brick's Barbed Wire and Beauty: A History of Bonsai in Southern California used our John Naka biography as one of her information sources.

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        The Coconino Institute of Technology (CIT) is a school within a school at Coconino High School in Flagstaff, AZ.  Its American Gardening Tour Virtual Field Trip begins with the Phoenix Bonsai Society.

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        The Chattanooga State Technical Community College uses us as an example for correct American Psychological Association style citation for World Wide Web sites, http://library.chattanoogastate.edu/research/apawebexamples.pdf.

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        See also this Internet Bonsai Club exchange from Jan. 16, 2007 about the historical research on our web site.

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        See this Bonsai Fachforum posting on 12/06/2006 by Gunter Lind, who responds to a previous post about his site being the most extensive regarding the history of bonsai.  He defers to our website having "the largest collection" ("Die mit Abstand umfangreichste Sammlung")  [I was fortunate enough to be able to correspond with Gunther between June 2006 and February 2007 -- he died that next April.]

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        The Historical dictionary of Japanese traditional theatre by Samuel L. Leiter (Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2006), lists our Hachi-No-Ki page on pg. 533 of its Bibliography.

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        In June 2006, the Art of Bonsai Website put up a copy of our article "Pen, The Origins of the Shallow Tray" (reproduced with permission) for which there is a forum for additional comments.

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        "Visiting your website (phoenixbonsai.com) is like dipping a toe in a deep pool and wondering at its depth."
Chris Cochrane, in post to Internet Bonsai Club, December 23, 2005

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        "Magical Miniature Landscapes: The Comprehensive History of Bonsai, at: http://www.phoenixbonsai.com/BonsaiHistory.html    Unlike most grandly titled projects like this, Baran's work lives up to the billing."
Alan Walker, former BCI president, in post to Internet Bonsai Club, December 15, 2005.

(In May 2007 he would graciously send us a CD containing over 2,000 images of teachers and artists Alan had collected at conventions and workshops over the years.  Some of these pictures would then be used on the website, especially in the Bonsai Book of Days project.)

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        "Collecting Team of Tahei Suzuki and His Brother Fukuji," Chapter V of "The Shimpaku Juniper: Its Secret History," World Bonsai Friendship Federation, http://web.archive.org/web/20080222214532/www.bonsai-wbff.org/shimpaku/main.shtml, ends with a footnote concerning the famous shimpaku "Fudo," and refers readers to more information at www.phoenixbonsai.com/KMurata.html.
(This article was also reprinted by late 2012 as one piece in German on the Bonsai Fachforum site, in 2013 as one piece in English on the Nebari Bonsai weblog, in late 2014 by the Alabama Bonsai Society, and without pictures on the Absolute Bonsai website by 2008.)

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        Our article on Kyogen was retrieved on 2/21/2003 and listed in pg. 106 of the Bibliography of the article by Gary B. White, received Nov. 17, 2005 at Gifu Shotoku Gakuen University, Contrast in Comedies: Japanese Kyogen and Italian Commedia Dell'Arte.

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       "Your biography ( http://www.phoenixbonsai.com/KMurata.html ) will be the most helpful source of information for the better understanding of Kyuzo. I have included the link.   http://www.iris.dti.ne.jp/~kyukaen/kyukaen/kyukaen-e.htm
With best regards. Kyuka-en Yukio MURATA"  
Personal correspondence of Kyuzo Murata's grandson with RJB, January 7, 2005

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        Our Portulacaria mongraph was one of the many citations used in Pamela Vass Thesis' December 2004 University of London Doctoral Thesis "Plant Diversity and Spatial Discontinuities of the Albany Centre in the south-eastern Cape, South Africa," http://www.ambiotek.com/theses/pam_vass_thesis_final.pdf, pp. 168, 217.

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        The first in-print reference to an article from the site was a sidebar on pg. 43 in Mary C. Miller's "Portulacaria afra, A Succulent In Tree Form," pp. 39-44 in the 2004-4 issue of Bonsai Today magazine, #68.  Our Portulacaria article was mentioned with its old users.uswest.net address.

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        Tasker, Georgia  "Bonsai Enthusiasts Continue a 2,000 Year Old Tradition," St. Lewis Post-Dispatch, Oct. 31, 2002, pg. 101, is apparently a re-write of the below article published earlier in the month.

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        Tasker, Georgia  "Bonsai! Passionate, near-obsessive devotion drives practioners of this ancient art," The Miami Herald, Herald.com, Oct. 13, 2002, cites our website.  Used material from The Big Picture page.

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        A review of Craig's book at 
http://www.bonsai4me.com/AdvTech/The%20Bonsai%20School%20Review.html includes "Parts One and Two of The Bonsai School deals [sic] with the basics of bonsai containing sound horticultural advice for both the novice and more experienced enthusiast alike. It also contains what has to be the most most comprehensive account of Bonsai through history I have seen by Robert J. Baran."

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        "When I visited your excellent site I was initially interested in the John Naka section. However, I read further and realised that your research into the history of Bonsai was the finest that I have ever read.  I am in the midst of writing a book on Bonsai, called Bonsai School, and I would like to enquire if you would allow me to use extracts from the historical sections to show the development of Bonsai in the Far East...
        "I do hope that you are able to assist me as, quite honestly, I now realise that anything I say about the historical aspects of Bonsai in Japan would simply be inadequate without your wonderful references."

Craig Coussins, Scottish bonsai master and author, www.bonsaiinformation.co.uk, in e-mail to RJB, November 21, 2001, for his book to be released Nov. 2002

        And so, pp. 26-36 of The Bonsai School are based on  ChineseSchools and pp. 37-39 are based on The Big Picture.

Craig's site includes a copy of the Chinese Schools page at http://www.bonsaiinformation.com/Penjing.htm

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        My article on "America Peeks at Bonsai" was listed in pg. 231 of the Bibliography of the October 2001 thesis by Hayley Wilson, in partial fulfillment of a Master of Arts Degree in The Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, The Practice and Meaning of Bonsai, Ikebana, and Tea in Montreal and Abroad: A Case Study of the Processes of Cultural Globalization.

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        "The Art and History of Bonsai" by Meagan Gates, Central Oregon Community College, Winter 2001, Humanities 201, Culture(s) & Literature(s) of Asia included a review of this web site.

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        "Just read your article on Portulacaria, all I can say is WOW."
James J. Smith, Vero Beach, FL, Portulacaria bonsai expert, in e-mail to RJB, August 20, 2000.  (As Jim supplied photographs and information for the above 2004-4 Bonsai Today magazine article, he might have seen the web article during the story's writing.)

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        In the April 2000 issue of the University of Arizona, Yavapai County Cooperative Extension, Yavapai Gardens Master Gardener Newsletter, the first four pages are about Bonsai, enthusiastically referencing us (the old URL, of course, in this early Kudo).

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        "I have just discovered your Website and have marvelled at the amount of information you have placed within.  The teaching sections, comprehensive history pages and book lists I think are very useful for others so I have linked to them from my History and How-to pages on my website - The Bonsai in Asia Guide Book - online at http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Palace/7574/..."
John Oldland, Perth, Western Australia, in e-mail to RJB, January 23, 2000

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        "Bonsai in Period: Tray Plantings in Medieval Japan" by Lady Tsukime extensively cites this web site, although she refers to the older links to some of the pages.

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        The directory Suite101.com ("Real People Helping Real People") for the topic of Bonsai has 14 web sites chosen by David J. Brock  Number 11 is www.phoenixbonsai.com : "I include this website because of its outstanding pages devoted to the history of bonsai. This website is a great reference for understanding the history and development of bonsai."

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        Seasonal Care Information pages ( Summer, Autumn, Winter, and Spring ) for www.bonsaisite.com is based on the unique-to-Phoenix Seasonal Care Information.

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        Cowing, Rev. Craig L.  "A Little Spot Enclosed by Grace: A Biblical Spirituality of Bonsai," World Bonsai Friendship Federation, http://www.bonsai-wbff.org/enclosedbygrace.shtml, cites our website for history of bonsai in the west.  Used material from Pre1945 Bibliography page.

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        The website Dao House...Later Daoist History includes a link to Fei Jiang-fang: "Short essay by Robert J. Baran (Phoenix) tells the story of one of the immortal "Gourd Elders" and his magical miniature world."





A Google search on 27 Apr 2010
revealed the following non-English references to our site among the 38 pages of results returned.

John NakaSpanish ; Vietnamese ; Portuguese ; and German.
Saburo KatoJapanese.
Kyuzo MurataGerman.
"Fudo"Portuguese.
Portulacaria (Elephant Food)Spanish ; French ; and Greek.
KokufutenSpanish and French.
Engelbert KaempferCroatian.
AnomaliesPortuguese.
PenBulgarian.
StampsLithuanian.
Stamps, Maldive IslandsItalian.
Stamps, VietnamVietnamese.
1910 British-Japanese ExpositionJapanese.
Peter MundyHindi.
Eliza ScidmoreSpanish.
Wife of London's New Lord MayorGerman.
The term "bonsai"Japanese.
BooksPolish.



Re: Copyright Fair Use




Unless otherwise stated on this or another specific page, all text on this web site was authored, typed, designed, and edited by Robert J. Baran from myriad sources I have painstakenly tried to always document.



In order to "give credit where credit is due," the following has been compiled.  The individuals below have assisted in their own ways, sometimes unknowingly, the development of this web site.  Their influence is not otherwise adequately listed on the various pages here.




From the Acknowledgements Page of the Unpublished Manuscript
MAGICAL MINIATURE LANDSCAPES


"The author would like to thank the Phoenix Public Library and Laurel at the Arizona InterLibrary Loan Center there (1987-91, 1995-96) for allowing me access to holdings across the country -- and thanks to those widespread college and community libraries who participated.  The Valley Garden Center's library and that of the Phoenix Bonsai Society.  The members of the PBS for providing ongoing support for this project and access to some of their personal libraries, especially Elsie Andrade, Doug and Gail Acker, and Max and Shirley Miller.  To all the members also, and visiting members from other clubs at PBS meetings and shows for valuable input, insights, and encouragement.
Thank-you to former members Roseanne Elwinger, Alice Feffer, and John Finkey for their donations of books and magazines to the Phoenix Bonsai Society library, of which the author was librarian from 1990-95.

Thanks to Alan Grossman for his suggestions on resources and art history.

Thank-you to various co-workers from AGP/BCP/DHS for their assistance in helping me learn WordPerfect (1992-96) as I transferred my notes over to that format.
Thank-you also to Nelson Gildenmeister and Sam Fry for their technical/hardware support.
Thanks to ABS Editors Jack Wikle, the late Arch Hawkins, and Jill Hurd for their comments and direction for my articles based on the working notes from this book.
Thanks also to Wendy Zaritsky for her insightful marketing analysis and advice.

Thanks to the Fry family and Frank and Ann Vargo for their support and encouragement, and to my other uncle, Greg Vargo, for his contribution to keep my interest going with a nominal membership in the Phoenix Bonsai Society way back when, 1971-72.

I thank my father, Joseph, who showed me the annual joy and basics of gardening from an early age; and my mother, Virginia, for lending a patient and understanding ear.  To my parents also for their unexpectedly generous financial and emotional support over the years.
Thanks also to a very special companion Maine Coon cat, Dance, who was with me prior to and through most of this book's research, and her briefer partner, lap-sitting domestic shorthair Shass.

Finally, I would be remiss if I didn't acknowledge the spirit of Serendipity which led me through much of my research -- and, in fact, first interested me in the subject on Halloween 1969 when after school I came upon Ann Kimball Pipe's book at the local branch of the Cleveland Public Library while roaming the aisles without a particular topic in mind.  Who knew what that particular check-out would lead to..."




PRE-SITE

Henri Vermeulen [past ABS president], whose Winter 1994 ABS Journal article "Taking the Information Highway To The Art Of Bonsai" (pp. 144-145) opened a door.

Scott Eastland and Byrd Preston, whose early personal adventures with the Internet and gracious allowing me to access it weekly using the latter's computer April 1995 through August 1996 planted many seeds.  My first stint with the Internet Bonsai Club was during that time period, also.

Joan McCarter, whose discussion of her HTML class developed the idea that the Phoenix Bonsai Society could eventually make its own Internet web site, wow, just like the big guys. 

J.C. Walker, whose [at the time limited] experience with a personal web site through uswest.net in March 1999 [which would eventually become qwest.net and later CenturyLink] led me to sign up with these folks as my first ISP.




SITE

The vast majority of this site up to early 2006 was created with the WYSIWYG abilities of Netscape Composer, originally courtesy of qwest.net, whose various levels of technical support and customer service had been called upon in the punctuated evolution of this site, and with Red River Net.com, my second ISP, whose technical support staff handled the technical stuff so I didn't have to.  Since a mid-January 2006 computer crash, I have used Arachnophilia 5.2 - 5.4 software to more slowly update and add to this site.  (No historical information was lost during the crash: "Back-up early, Back-up often!")  In more recent years, CoffeeCup Free HTML Editor and FileZilla Client have been my tools of choice.

Guy Beaver, whose technical assistance on many early occasions (and some scanned images, specifically those for the first Nursery ads and Postage Stamps) made "simple" technology less complicated for someone more comfortable with just a word processing program.

Amy Snyder, whose suggestion in May 1999 that I shouldn't just sit on a detailed bio for John Naka as an obituary-to-be (newspapers and magazines have them "in the can" ready to go) has led to a much more comprehensive review available right now of our great teacher's ongoing life and works.  The bios for sensei Yoshimura, Kato, and Murata were spinoffs from Naka-san's.

My son, Andrew, who typed the rough draft for one of my articles into Netscape Composer in June 1999 and, several years later, while learning web design in high school, regularly checked in to see what's up on his dad's large web site.  And who has helped Paint some changes to some business card .jpg here.

The now late Jim Lewis, whose insistance in October 1999 that there were too many dancing pyramid GIFs -- particularly on the club's menu page --  helped make this site a little easier on the eyes.  (Reviewing my notes I see that he was repeating what Guy had previously pointed out back in May.  Don't want to be too hasty to make changes...) 

Tomas Melo from Slovakia, whose enthusiasm has supplied me with historical material, images and links which have been added to various parts of the site.

Riley Diana, whose March 2002 inquiry about the history of dwarf tree collecting in the Chinese culture and specifically about an apparently little-known lucrative small industry which it was to the royal families, resulted in a speculative answer by me which got me thinking about Some of What We Don't Know.  What was originally an expansion of a much earlier list I had compiled while researching MML now continues to develop in a most unique fashion.

Marc Zimmerman, who provided me with images known and unknown of many of the Bonsai on postage stamps.

Kathy Gustafson, Maggie Knight, and Derrick Price (no relation) for previous support and enthusiasm for this project.

The InterLibrary Loan departments of the libraries in Kingman, Arizona and in Security-Widefield, Colorado (thanks, Inez and Patsy!) and Colorado Springs for their abilities to find most of my varied and obscure requests.

And thanks to the Phoenix Bonsai Society for allowing me the forum and space for my history notes on their website.  In late Feb. 2016 these notes were transferred to this current site.

Finally, among others, my truly awesome wife Shirley Baran (née Price), and Mike and Ardie Apostolos, Cliff Broyles (for some life-saving support beyond his knowledge), Chris Cochrane (in the most respectful sense, my "fan club's president"), Nona DiDomenico, Lindsay Farr (my very knowledgeable long-term supporter from Australia), Bill Fox, Ernest Hasan, Susie Kingston, the late Jim Lewis (again, who a few years before passing on wrote me that he felt he'd never be able to finish exploring this vast site), Max Miller, Mr. Yoshihiro Nakamizu and his assistant Ms. Harumi Fujino, Ken Roberts, John Romano, Penny Schneck, Jamie Sims, Bill Valavanis (my esteemed colleague in documenting this interest's history), and Alan Walker (my source for so many pictures of contemporary enthusiasts) -- all whose continuing support and enthusiasm for this labor of love further inspire me.



Thank you to all.






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